Double Love – adopting siblings

We always thought we would adopt siblings. Together, from the beginning. After a lengthy and turbulent journey, I thought I wouldn’t be able to face doing it again. That I wouldn’t be able to find the strength. Again.

In essence, I guess I thought it would be better to get it “over and done with” in one go. We were also acutely aware of the shortage of prospective adopters prepared to take siblings. Of the importance of keeping siblings together. It’s odd how things never quite go to plan. How the universe moves in mysterious ways.

When we had the call a few weeks after approval, it was not what we were expecting. We’d been assessed for siblings. Been approved for siblings. Were practically and emotionally preparing for siblings. The call was a possible match – but for one. That moment is all a bit of a blur. I was so taken aback. Knocked off my perch.

A few days later we realised this was in fact the most unbelievably life changing call. The circumstances around the link were so positive. It would have been foolish of us not to find out more. Of course, as soon as we saw the profile – the picture – that was it. Love at first sight.

The rest is history as people would say. Four years later we did apply again. We do have the siblings we always wanted. They may not be connected through birth, but they are brother and sister in every way possible. We made the right decision. Followed our instincts. Listened to our heads and hearts. Took guidance from the professionals. The mere thought that we might have passed our daughter by as it wasn’t our original plan, well, that’s not actually worth thinking about.

So, what is it really like to adopt siblings? – at the same time. I’m delighted to introduce one of the first adoption Instagram accounts I followed – @andso_theadventurebegins. With her husband, they adopted twins and here she shares with us her story.

“I always knew I would be a mum and adoption was always a route I was open to taking. Thankfully, my husband was on board too.

The journey wasn’t straightforward. During the process there are many hoops to jump through and lots of questions to answer. One question was easy though – “would you consider adopting siblings?”.  This was a no brainer for us. If the opportunity arose then yes, we would love to adopt siblings.

We both have siblings ourselves and knew we wanted more than one child. So, it made sense to be assessed and approved for siblings. Importantly for us, it also made sense that our children would have a shared history. We were aware that not all children are able to be adopted together. We felt that if this was the right thing for the children, we could meet that need of keeping them together.

We were approved to adopt at panel in February 2017. We waited two weeks for confirmation from the agency decision maker (ADM). Our social worker called to tell us we had ADM approval and then added “would you consider adopting twins? I think they would be a good match for you.” I thought she was joking at first. She wasn’t.

I was at the social workers office within the hour to collect the twins profiles. The photos were useless. Their descriptions were just an A4 page each, but that was enough for us to want to know more. Three months later the match was approved at panel and they came home with us for good in July 2018.

Then came the learning curve and it was a steep one! It was no surprise to us that the children had challenging and complex needs.  But we were not prepared for the different parenting styles each of them required.  Our boy, Bambam, liked to shout, demanded constant attention and generally liked to be in charge. Our girl, Bean, hated any loud or sudden noises, was incredibly insular and needed encouragement to engage with simple tasks. At times, especially when there was only one of us at home, this felt impossible. I have to be honest to say we found it difficult to meet both of their needs consistently.

Bambam and Bean have what I believe to be a trauma bond. For some children, a trauma bond with a sibling can lead to difficulties in developing an attachment with a caregiver because the children are over reliant on each other. Bambam and Bean didn’t necessarily have that to begin with, but I believe it developed over time. Initially, they didn’t play together. They didn’t even really care what the other did or said. However, with their shared history came a shared trauma. They had experienced this together – albeit in completely different ways.

Although they both suffered neglect, one was favoured and the other was scapegoated. When they first came home, they would fight for resources and really hurt one another. We’re not talking usual sibling rivalry. It was survival of the fittest type behaviour. They couldn’t be left alone together. Ever. This makes sense when their experience had been there wasn’t enough love, attention, food or toys to go around. On top of that, they would desperately attempt to stop the other being upset. Seemingly in fear of repercussions for themselves.

It was hard and I am sad to say I sometimes wondered if they should have been placed together. We threw ourselves into therapeutic parenting. We tried to meet their individual needs; one went to nursery a month before the other for example because they needed different things. Gradually the fog cleared.

They started asking about each other. They stopped hurting each other as much. Bean found her voice and Bambam began to let her. They would spontaneously hug and kiss each other. Then, one day they asked to share a bedroom and still do.  Now I have no doubt that keeping them together was the right thing to do.

I have shared all of this not to scare you, but to provide some insight into the reality, or at least our reality, of adopting siblings. It was hard and, on some days, it still is. They still have hugely differing needs. It’s impossible to do it all, all the time. But would we do it all again? Yes. In a heartbeat. They are the very best decision we have ever made.”

This is such an open and honest account of a real challenge adoption can bring. Thank you @andso_theadventurebegins for sharing the reality of how early life trauma can impact on the behaviours of little ones. A situation that prospective adopters may be faced with. Not all. But some.

My intention with these blogs is to show the good, and the challenges. This guest blog does just that. As mentioned, this is not to scare you. After all, it’s a story with a happy ending. It may not be this way for you. But, I think it’s important to know the possibilities. To hear first hand. Remember there is a lot of support out there for adopters experiencing challenges. Through your adoption agency or the likes of leading adoption charity Adoption UK.

Despite these difficulties. Without question they made the right decision. For them. For their children. It’s an absolute joy to see how they are progressing. To see the love, commitment and dedication these precious children now receive. It’s so heart-warming to see the bond the children now have with each other. With their mummy and daddy.

Adoption isn’t always straight forward. The early days are tough. As you wade through the unknown. Scared to say or do the wrong thing. I tried to remind myself that becoming parents is difficult. For everyone. In whatever way you happen to have your children. Stories I’d hear from friends with birth children showed this was of course difficult too. Challenges are real for us all. Whatever form they take…“we are not all in the same boat, but we are all in the same storm”.

As adoptive parents, we are not responsible for what our children may have been through. Often, I think we carry the burden as if we had. We give them the love, safety and security they deserve. And with time, we help them heal. Show how life should be. As a forever family. And it’s without question the best feeling in the world.

If you want to see this beautiful adoption story as it continues to unfold, you can follow @andso_theadventurebegins on Instagram – don’t forget you can find me there too @rosemarylucasadoptiontales and can also Purchase a copy here of my children’s adoption storybook – The Family Fairies.

Published by rosemarylucas

Adoptive mum and author of The Family Fairies, a children's storybook helping to explain the adoption process.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: